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Movie:

Pride & Prejudice

The only thing you really need to know is that the 1995 version of Pride and Prejudice, based on the Jane Austen novel, is one of the finest films ever made, despite originally being made as a miniseries for TV. Isn’t it amazing the difference that casting can make? The 2005 version of Pride and Prejudice is quite good – just not nearly as good as the original A&E version, despite the fact that the more recent one has some good stars, including superstars Keira Knightley, Judi Dench, and Donald Sutherland. And Knightley is a fine Elizabeth Bennet – just not with quite the edge that Jennifer Ehle plays in the AE version. Matthew Macfadyen is not bad as Mr. Darcy – but he does not define the role in the same convincing way as Colin Firth – far less famous in 1995. With the exception of Dench, every character in the 2005 version is fine, and you would think you had seen a fine movie – until you see the 1995 version. One thing is common to both versions is that they stay fairly constant to Austen’s text. read more Explore

Pride & Prejudice

X

The only thing you really need to know is that the 1995 version of Pride and Prejudice, based on the Jane Austen novel, is one of the finest films ever made, despite originally being made as a miniseries for TV. Isn’t it amazing the difference that casting can make? The 2005 version of Pride and Prejudice is quite good – just not nearly as good as the original A&E version, despite the fact that the more recent one has some good stars, including superstars Keira Knightley, Judi Dench, and Donald Sutherland. And Knightley is a fine Elizabeth Bennet – just not with quite the edge that Jennifer Ehle plays in the AE version. Matthew Macfadyen is not bad as Mr. Darcy – but he does not define the role in the same convincing way as Colin Firth – far less famous in 1995. With the exception of Dench, every character in the 2005 version is fine, and you would think you had seen a fine movie – until you see the 1995 version. One thing is common to both versions is that they stay fairly constant to Austen’s text.

Explore

Book:

Greatest Works of Art of Western Civilization

Hoving, the former director of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, has selected the 111 greatest works of Western art that he believes are "the pinnacles of quality, elegance, and artistic strength, the best mankind has created, the hallmarks of unalloyed genius." Very wide variety of work, both in mediums, places, and times. read more Explore

Greatest Works of Art of Western Civilization

X

Hoving, the former director of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, has selected the 111 greatest works of Western art that he believes are "the pinnacles of quality, elegance, and artistic strength, the best mankind has created, the hallmarks of unalloyed genius." Very wide variety of work, both in mediums, places, and times.

Explore

Television:

The Wire

The only thing that Attitude Media and Barack Obama will ever agree on is that this was the best show on TV, and Omar our favorite character. This is, simply, the best crime drama for TV. Ever. Set in the city of Baltimore, there is really nothing terribly different about it in terms of plot; cops vs. drug dealers. But it gives a brilliant and quite insightful view of the way local politics really works in a city like Baltimore. The show is harshly realistic in every way. The acting and directing is superb. What is truly amazing about the acting is that some of the lead characters are British, and yet adopt perfect Baltimore accents, in particular Idris Elba. Many of the actors, Elba, Dominic West, Michael Kenneth Williams, Amy Ryan, have gone on to become major stars. Don’t confuse this by comparing it to well done trash like The Sopranos. The Sopranos focused on a bunch of fictional thugs who aren’t worthy of attention. But the Wire is a morality tale, because, as in life, good and evil are so interwoven as to be indistinguishable – cops are often senselessly brutal, or just lazy, or corrupt. The hero, McNulty, is a hard drinking womanizer with his share of faults. Some of the drug dealers like Omar are often brutal – including maiming unarmed people, but have their code of conduct. There is no clear good and evil – but the point being, like life itself, you have to make the effort to figure it out. The Wire is not about an amoral world, like the world of the Sopranos, but about a complex world where you have to make an effort to distinguish good and evil. And in the end “it all matters”. We’ll give you just one example of how the show merges lowbrow and highbrow in a realistic and fascinating way. In episode 3 of season One, one of the drug dealers is trying to explain the game of chess to a couple of initially disinterested colleagues; street level “hoppers”: “This is the King. He the man. He move one space any damn direction he chose because he the king…..you see this? This the queen. She smart, she fierce. She move any damn way she want as far as she want. She gets shit done. The pawns, they be like the front lines, out in the field. “ read more Explore

The Wire

X

The only thing that Attitude Media and Barack Obama will ever agree on is that this was the best show on TV, and Omar our favorite character.

This is, simply, the best crime drama for TV. Ever. Set in the city of Baltimore, there is really nothing terribly different about it in terms of plot; cops vs. drug dealers. But it gives a brilliant and quite insightful view of the way local politics really works in a city like Baltimore. The show is harshly realistic in every way.

The acting and directing is superb. What is truly amazing about the acting is that some of the lead characters are British, and yet adopt perfect Baltimore accents, in particular Idris Elba. Many of the actors, Elba, Dominic West, Michael Kenneth Williams, Amy Ryan, have gone on to become major stars.

Don’t confuse this by comparing it to well done trash like The Sopranos. The Sopranos focused on a bunch of fictional thugs who aren’t worthy of attention. But the Wire is a morality tale, because, as in life, good and evil are so interwoven as to be indistinguishable – cops are often senselessly brutal, or just lazy, or corrupt. The hero, McNulty, is a hard drinking womanizer with his share of faults. Some of the drug dealers like Omar are often brutal – including maiming unarmed people, but have their code of conduct. There is no clear good and evil – but the point being, like life itself, you have to make the effort to figure it out. The Wire is not about an amoral world, like the world of the Sopranos, but about a complex world where you have to make an effort to distinguish good and evil. And in the end “it all matters”.
We’ll give you just one example of how the show merges lowbrow and highbrow in a realistic and fascinating way. In episode 3 of season One, one of the drug dealers is trying to explain the game of chess to a couple of initially disinterested colleagues; street level “hoppers”:

“This is the King. He the man. He move one space any damn direction he chose because he the king…..you see this? This the queen. She smart, she fierce. She move any damn way she want as far as she want. She gets shit done. The pawns, they be like the front lines, out in the field. “

Explore
 

AM Recommends

Movie:

Pride & Prejudice

The only thing you really need to know is that the 1995 version of Pride and Prejudice, based on the Jane Austen novel, is one of the finest films ever made, despite originally being made as a miniseries for TV. Isn’t it amazing the difference that casting can make? The 2005 version of Pride and Prejudice is quite good – just not nearly as good as the original A&E version, despite the fact that the more recent one has some good stars, including superstars Keira Knightley, Judi Dench, and Donald Sutherland. And Knightley is a fine Elizabeth Bennet – just not with quite the edge that Jennifer Ehle plays in the AE version. Matthew Macfadyen is not bad as Mr. Darcy – but he does not define the role in the same convincing way as Colin Firth – far less famous in 1995. With the exception of Dench, every character in the 2005 version is fine, and you would think you had seen a fine movie – until you see the 1995 version. One thing is common to both versions is that they stay fairly constant to Austen’s text. read more Explore

Pride & Prejudice

X

The only thing you really need to know is that the 1995 version of Pride and Prejudice, based on the Jane Austen novel, is one of the finest films ever made, despite originally being made as a miniseries for TV. Isn’t it amazing the difference that casting can make? The 2005 version of Pride and Prejudice is quite good – just not nearly as good as the original A&E version, despite the fact that the more recent one has some good stars, including superstars Keira Knightley, Judi Dench, and Donald Sutherland. And Knightley is a fine Elizabeth Bennet – just not with quite the edge that Jennifer Ehle plays in the AE version. Matthew Macfadyen is not bad as Mr. Darcy – but he does not define the role in the same convincing way as Colin Firth – far less famous in 1995. With the exception of Dench, every character in the 2005 version is fine, and you would think you had seen a fine movie – until you see the 1995 version. One thing is common to both versions is that they stay fairly constant to Austen’s text.

Explore

Coming Soon View All >>

Feb 12 2016

Gods of Egypt - scheduled to release in 2016

In Theaters
More >>
Dec 18 2015

Star Wars: The Force Awakens (in 3D) - scheduled to release in 2015

In Theaters
More >>
Nov 20 2015

Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 2 - scheduled to release in 2015

In Theaters
More >>
Aug 28 2015

Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon: The Green Legend - releasing on IMAX only!

In IMAX Theaters
More >>

Media Notes View All >>

The Power of Print - National Geographic

Print may lose out to the Net in the end, but it won't go down without a fight, as shown by the April 2015 issue of National Geographic which has a couple great foldouts. One is called Light Flights about the effect of passenger bags and other items on aviation fuel consumption. The other, which is really great, is about Trajan's Column in Rome. Any fold out like these are much more effective when you can see it all at once, rather than scrolling on a computer screen. Click here to read about Light Flights. Click here to read about Trajan's Column.
More >>

The Power of Print - National Geographic

Print may lose out to the Net in the end, but it won't go down without a fight, as shown by the April 2015 issue of National Geographic which has a couple great foldouts. One is called Light Flights about the effect of passenger bags and other items on aviation fuel consumption. The other, which is really great, is about Trajan's Column in Rome. Any fold out like these are much more effective when you can see it all at once, rather than scrolling on a computer screen. Click here to read about Light Flights. Click here to read about Trajan's Column.
See More >>

Coming Soon

Feb 12 2016

Gods of Egypt - scheduled to release in 2016

In Theaters
More >>
Dec 18 2015

Star Wars: The Force Awakens (in 3D) - scheduled to release in 2015

In Theaters
More >>
Nov 20 2015

Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 2 - scheduled to release in 2015

In Theaters
More >>
Aug 28 2015

Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon: The Green Legend - releasing on IMAX only!

In IMAX Theaters
More >>

Media Notes

The Power of Print - National Geographic

Print may lose out to the Net in the end, but it won't go down without a fight, as shown by the April 2015 issue of National Geographic which has a couple great foldouts. One is called Light Flights about the effect of passenger bags and other items on aviation fuel consumption. The other, which is really great, is about Trajan's Column in Rome. Any fold out like these are much more effective when you can see it all at once, rather than scrolling on a computer screen. Click here to read about Light Flights. Click here to read about Trajan's Column.
More >>

The Power of Print - National Geographic

Print may lose out to the Net in the end, but it won't go down without a fight, as shown by the April 2015 issue of National Geographic which has a couple great foldouts. One is called Light Flights about the effect of passenger bags and other items on aviation fuel consumption. The other, which is really great, is about Trajan's Column in Rome. Any fold out like these are much more effective when you can see it all at once, rather than scrolling on a computer screen. Click here to read about Light Flights. Click here to read about Trajan's Column.
See More >>
 

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