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Media Notes

The Strand is New York City's most famous used bookstore; although they actually sell plenty of new books as well. Books they count as "new" are actually used, review copies which publishers send to book reviewers, which editorial assistants at publishing houses often sell to the Strand at about 25% of their retail price. Lots of other fascinating bits of info about the Strand's business in this New York Magazine profile.

This is a typical glossy men's fashion magazine. Slick. Usual fawning coverage of designers, who are all either advertisers or potential advertisers. It's okay to fawn, I guess, but it's hard to tell her if there is any separation between editorial content and ads, or if the much of the latter is masked as the former. For instance, is the Most Wanted section editorial or ads disguised as editorial? Does anyone other than Attitude Media care?

Is Dan Neil, who writes the Rumble Seat column for the Wall Street Journal, the most talented automotive writer working in the US? He combines a real talent for amusing writing with a firm technical grasp of automotive engineering. He also occasionally inserts a few irritating comments showing his distaste for plutocrats, which is somewhat hypocritical, considering those plutocrats are the ones buying the expensive cars that Neil writes about. Still, all in all, a talented guy.

A Friendly Mixtape?

A friend and colleague of mine sent a mixtape for Christmas to her friends and colleagues; nicely done and organized. This woman happens to be a screenwriter in LA. So you might think she would care about things like intellectual property theft. She is simply giving away (by giving free access to the files) work of others she has not paid for. She probably would not appreciate it if someone stole her screenplays, but it's amazing how often people in the business of producing songs, books, movies, magazines think it's okay to steal someone else's work. And they're not just stealing; they're stealing from other artists who they admire. Amazing.

On January 23, 2015 a new low was set in the trivialization of media. The Wall Street Journal, America's largest, and generally best, newspaper, devoted the entire back page (D8) of one of it's sections to the burning issue of whether - in a 45-7 playoff victory, the New England Patriots, under-inflated the footballs from by 2 pounds per square inch.

Please keep in mind that, like any other day, on January 23 there were murders, rapes, important political developments, new scientific findings, technological break-throughs, bankruptcies and the whole array of other issues affecting over 300 million Americans and billions of people around the globe. But somehow the Journal thought that "Deflategate" was worthy of blanket coverage, with 3 separate articles. As Patriot's quarterback Tom Brady said, "This is not ISIS."

WALL-E (stylized with an interpunct as WALL·E) is a 2008 American computer-animated comedy science fiction film produced by Pixar Animation Studios and directed by Andrew Stanton. The story follows a robot named WALL-E, who is designed to clean up an abandoned, waste-covered Earth far in the future. He falls in love with another robot named EVE, who also has a programmed task, and follows her into outer space on an adventure that changes the destiny of both his kind and humanity. Both robots exhibit an appearance of free will and emotions similar to humans, which develop further as the film progresses.

After directing Finding Nemo, Stanton felt Pixar had created believable simulations of underwater physics and was willing to direct a film set largely in space. WALL-E has minimal dialogue in its early sequences; many of the characters do not have voices, but instead communicate with body language and robotic sounds, which were designed by Ben Burtt. It is also Pixar's first animated feature with segments featuring live-action characters.

Media Notes

The Strand is New York City's most famous used bookstore; although they actually sell plenty of new books as well. Books they count as "new" are actually used, review copies which publishers send to book reviewers, which editorial assistants at publishing houses often sell to the Strand at about 25% of their retail price. Lots of other fascinating bits of info about the Strand's business in this New York Magazine profile.

This is a typical glossy men's fashion magazine. Slick. Usual fawning coverage of designers, who are all either advertisers or potential advertisers. It's okay to fawn, I guess, but it's hard to tell her if there is any separation between editorial content and ads, or if the much of the latter is masked as the former. For instance, is the Most Wanted section editorial or ads disguised as editorial? Does anyone other than Attitude Media care?

Media Note Items 25 - 30 Out of 31

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