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Media Notes

This is an interesting article about Movie director Derek Cianfrance, director of The Place Beyond the Pines and Blue Valentine:
Men's Journal p.54, May 2013

On why he won't have a rape scene in his movies:

"Even for $3 million, I can't rape somebody onscreen. Those choices will follow you around your whole life".

Digital publishers contend for a slice of the profit pie from online video. But how much pie is there exactly to go around?

Since the dawn of media, stories have featured an average, or below average, looking middle aged man who somehow entrances a young beautiful woman. This has everything to do with the fact that the storyteller has most often been an average looking middle aged man. One of the most ridiculous examples being the otherwise fine movie classic, Manhattan, in which Woody Allen plays a 42 year old man with whom a 17 year old beauty, played by Mariel Hemingway, somehow becomes infatuated. Manhattan was directed by, surprise, Woody Allen, and co-written by, surprise, Woody Allen.

But now the Girls are having their revenge, as the distinctly unattractive Lena Dunham, creator of the hit HBO series "Girls," writes parts for herself whereby a wide variety of hunky men fall for a character played by....wait for it....her. Not only did Dunham create and star in the series, she also writes and directs many episodes. But hey, give Godzilla enough creative control, and you'll soon see a film in which Beyonce is climbing into his bed.

WALL-E (stylized with an interpunct as WALL·E) is a 2008 American computer-animated comedy science fiction film produced by Pixar Animation Studios and directed by Andrew Stanton. The story follows a robot named WALL-E, who is designed to clean up an abandoned, waste-covered Earth far in the future. He falls in love with another robot named EVE, who also has a programmed task, and follows her into outer space on an adventure that changes the destiny of both his kind and humanity. Both robots exhibit an appearance of free will and emotions similar to humans, which develop further as the film progresses.

After directing Finding Nemo, Stanton felt Pixar had created believable simulations of underwater physics and was willing to direct a film set largely in space. WALL-E has minimal dialogue in its early sequences; many of the characters do not have voices, but instead communicate with body language and robotic sounds, which were designed by Ben Burtt. It is also Pixar's first animated feature with segments featuring live-action characters.

The Adventures of Tintin, also known as The Adventures of Tintin: The Secret of the Unicorn is a 2011 3D motion capture computer-animated epic adventure film based on The Adventures of Tintin, the comics series by Belgian cartoonist Hergé. Directed by Steven Spielberg, produced by Peter Jackson, and written by Steven Moffat, Edgar Wright and Joe Cornish, the film is based on three of Hergé's albums: The Crab with the Golden Claws (1941), The Secret of the Unicorn (1943), and Red Rackham's Treasure (1944).[5] The cast includes Jamie Bell, Andy Serkis, Daniel Craig, Nick Frost and Simon Pegg.

Spielberg acquired rights to produce a film based on The Adventures of Tintin series following Hergé's death in 1983, and re-optioned them in 2002. Filming was due to begin in October 2008 for a 2010 release, but release was delayed to 2011 after Universal opted out of producing the film with Paramount, who provided $30 million on pre-production. Sony chose to co-produce the film. The delay resulted in Thomas Sangster, who had been originally cast as Tintin, departing from the project. Producer Peter Jackson, whose company Weta Digital provided the computer animation, intends to direct a sequel. Spielberg and Jackson also hope to co-direct a third film.[6] The world première took place on 22 October 2011 in Brussels.[7] The film was released in the UK and other European countries on 26 October 2011, and in the USA on 21 December 2011, in Digital 3D and IMAX.

Media Notes

This is an interesting article about Movie director Derek Cianfrance, director of The Place Beyond the Pines and Blue Valentine:
Men's Journal p.54, May 2013

On why he won't have a rape scene in his movies:

"Even for $3 million, I can't rape somebody onscreen. Those choices will follow you around your whole life".

Digital publishers contend for a slice of the profit pie from online video. But how much pie is there exactly to go around?

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